Newsletters

Newsletters | 16 September 2015

Fall 2015 Newsletter: Vol. 8 No. 6 Spatial Team

GPSfisher
This issue focuses on the Spatial Team of SNAMP. The SNAMP Spatial Team was formed to provide support for the other SNAMP science teams through spatial data acquisition and analysis. The objectives of the SNAMP Spatial Team were: (1) to provide base spatial data; (2) to create quality and accurate mapped products of use to other SNAMP science teams; (3) to explore and develop novel algorithms and methods for Lidar data analysis; and (4) to contribute to science and technology outreach around mapping and Lidar analysis for SNAMP participants. This newsletter is one of 6 final newsletters we are compiling that distill results and lessons learned from the SNAMP project. The full final SNAMP report (including FFEH, water, wildlife, spatial and participation reports) is available here. To learn more about the spatial team please check out the Fall 2015 Spatial Team Newsletter!

Newsletters | 14 September 2015

Fall 2015 Newsletter: Vol. 8 No. 5 Water Team

This newsletter shares the results of 8 years, 2008 – 2013, of water research by the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project on the effects of fuel treatments /forest thinnings on water quantity and quality at two project sites in the Sierra; Last Chance in the Tahoe National Forest and Sugar Pine in the Sierra National Forest. This newsletter is one of 6 final newsletters we are compiling that distill results and lessons learned from the SNAMP project. The full final SNAMP report (including FFEH, water, wildlife, spatial and participation reports) is available here. To learn more about the Water Team please check out the Fall 2015 Water Team Newsletter!

Newsletters | 11 September 2015

Fall 2015 Newsletter: Vol. 8 No. 4 PP Team

FieldDay

This issue focuses on the Public Participation Team’s Final Report (Appendix F) and conclusions from 8 years of implementing and studying the public participation process within the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project. This newsletter is one of 6 final newsletters we are compiling that distill results and lessons learned from the SNAMP project. The full final SNAMP report (including FFEH water, wildlife, spatial and participation reports) is available here. To learn more about the public participation team please check out the Fall 2015 PPT newsletter!

Newsletters | 10 September 2015

Fall 2015 Newsletter: Vol. 8 No. 3 FFEH Team

Northern Site
This is the final newsletter for the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project’s (SNAMP) Fire and Forest Ecosystem Health Team (FFEH). Here we share results from 8 years of research on the effects of forest thinning on fire behavior and forest health in Sierra National Forests. This newsletter is one of 6 final newsletters we are compiling that distill results and lessons learned from the SNAMP project. The full final SNAMP report (including FFEH water, wildlife, spatial and participation reports) is available here. The newsletter is available here: Fall 2015 FFEH newsletter.

Newsletters | 24 August 2015

Summer 2015 Newsletter: Vol 8 No 2 - Owl Team

Juvenile Owl
Since 2007, the SNAMP California Spotted Owl team has been working to understand if the potential long-term benefits (reduced fire risk) of Strategically Placed Landscape Area Treatments (SPLATs ) outweigh potential short-term impacts (habitat simplification) to spotted owls. They conducted a two-part analysis to assess the effects including: 1) a retrospective analysis using 20 years of demographic data collected at 74 spotted owl territories and 2) a prospective analysis (30 years into the future) of the effects of SPLATs and wildfire on spotted owl habitat and demography. Their results come at an important time with the increase in severe fires at large scales. Forest managers are looking at how to address fire severity by reducing fuels while keeping functional habitat for wildlife. To learn more about owl team research, please check out the Summer 2015 Newsletter.

Newsletters | 24 July 2015

Summer 2015 Newsletter: Vol 8. No. 1 - Fisher Team

fisherThis newsletter focuses on the conclusions of the Fisher Science Team who has been studying the Pacific fisher near Oakhurst Ca. Between 2007 and 2013, 110 individual fishers were captured, radiocollared, and tracked by fixed-wing aerial radiotelemetry. Additionally, cameras were placed within the Sugar Pine firesheds in 1 km2 grids, to determine variation in occupancy rates related to management activities. Ground-based radiotelemetry was used to monitor female fishers during denning seasons, and to recover carcasses of deceased fishers to determine cause of mortality. Results from this work are summarized in the newsletter. Please check it out here.

Newsletters | 6 November 2014

Fall 2014 Newsletter: Vol. 7 No. 2 - IT Meeting Wrap up

We are in the midst of a very busy final year as each team continues to work on data analysis, integration and final report writing. Part of our SNAMP commitment is to provide opportunities for all stakeholders to participate in meetings where information is shared and ideas exchanged. In this vein, each Science Team participated in either an in-person meeting or webinar to inform SNAMP participants of their current research results and integration metrics. This newsletter is intended to provide one more link to the study and results, as well as to help better prepare participants for the Annual Meeting webinar on November 6, 2014. Please check out the Fall 2014 Integration Newsletter

Newsletters | 31 March 2014

Spring 2014 Newsletter: Vol. 7 No. 1 - Integration

The Public Participation team discusses the SNAMP integration effort, which will provide a comparative framework that examines the resources we are evaluating: water, wildlife, and forest health, and the role of public participation in collaborative adaptive management (CAM). The goal is to enable managers and other stakeholders to compare the effects of SPLATs across resources. To learn more about the integration plan, please check out the Spring 2014 Integration Newsletter.

Newsletters | 19 December 2012

Fall 2012 Newsletter: Vol. 6 No. 1 - Water Team

The water team discusses their research questions, hypotheses and methods in our new SNAMP newsletter. The water team is exploring: (1) What are the timing and amount of water storage and routing in forested Sierra Nevada catchments? (2) What effects do forest treatments have on water quality, quantity (yield), storage & routing through the catchments? And (3) What is the transferability of information from four intensively measured headwater streams to a larger area fireshed response? To learn more about the water team research, please check out the Fall 2012 Water Newsletter.

Newsletters | 27 December 2011

Winter 2011 Newsletter: Vol 5. No. 2 - Forest Fuels Treatment Field Trip

Last Chance Field Trip - PPT
This issue focuses on an October 2011 SNAMP field trip to the Last Chance study site (the SNAMP northern site) to study fuels treatment on the ground. In this newsletter, we retrace our steps, review the stops of the field trip, and highlight some of the significant conversations and realizations made by participants. This field trip was important because we had the opportunity to examine the fuel treatments for the first time and provide a forum for learning through onsite discussion and dialogue among the participants. To learn more about the field trip, please check out the Winter '11 Forest Fuels Treatment Field Trip Newsletter.

Newsletters | 8 April 2011

Spring 2011 Newsletter: Vol 5. No. 1 - Spatial Team

GPSfisher
The spatial team is using Lidar data to map forests before and after vegetation treatments and measuring forest habitat characteristics across treatment and control sites. These data will provide detailed information about how forest habitat was affected by fuel management treatments. Airborne Lidar (light detection and ranging) works by bouncing light against a target in a similar way to sonar or radar. To learn more about Lidar data and spatial team research, please check out the Spring '11 Spatial Newsletter.

Newsletters | 3 February 2011

Spring 2011 Newsletter: Vol 4. No. 3 - Owl Team

Juvenile Owl
The SNAMP owl team is studying the effects of SPLATs (Strategically Placed Landscape Area Treatments) on spotted owl site occupancy, survival and reproduction. The owl team is collecting pre- and post-treatment data on vegetative structure within owl territories to estimate the effects of SPLATs on owl habitat. The owl team just finished their fourth field season on the SNAMP project, and are currently analyzing data from the last four field seasons. To learn more about owl team research, please check out the Spring 2011 Newsletter.

Newsletters | 20 September 2010

Fall 2010 Newsletter: Vol 4. No. 2 - Fisher Team

GPSfisher
The SNAMP fisher study is an eight year study initiated in September of 2007 in the Bass Lake Ranger District of the Sierra National Forest. The fisher team research goals include: (1) determining the population paprameters and limiting factors for the Pacific fisher; and (2) evaluating the effects of fuel reduction treatments (SPLATs) on resource use, survival, and population persistence of Pacific fisher. The fisher team has captured and radio collared 66 individual fishers since the start of the study, and is currently monitoring 18 fishers. To learn more about the fisher team research and recent results from their study, please check out the Fall '10 Fisher Newsletter.

Newsletters | 3 March 2010

Spring 2010 Newsletter: Vol 4. No. 1 - Fire Integration Project

Fire Model Results

In this newsletter, we summarize results from the Fire Integration Project, a joint effort between SNAMP and the USFS Pacific Southwest Research Station. One goal of SNAMP is to integrate what we are learning at our specific research sites with similar efforts in the Sierra Nevada. By proactively expanding the focus to several research teams, we scientists improve both the credibility and relevance of our research. This study compares the performance of fuel management strategies currently being implemented on Forest Service lands in the Sierra Nevada using fire behavior modeling. The objective is to better understand how fuel management treatments are implemented in real landscapes, and if these treatments perform as theory predicts. To learn more about this research, please check out the Spring 2010 Newsletter.

Newsletters | 14 October 2009

Fall 2009 SNAMP Newsletter: Vol. 3 No. 2 - Water Team

WaterTeam
The SNAMP water team will be investigating impacts of strategic fuel treatments in SNAMP study areas on both water quantity and quality in headwater catchments of treatment and control firesheds. Their goal is to better understand the water storage in and movement through the catchments: how the water begins as snow or rain, interacts with the landscape, and eventually exits the system as stream discharge. To learn more about the water team and their research, please check out the Fall '09 Water Newsletter.

Newsletters | 15 May 2009

Spring 2009 SNAMP Newsletter: Vol. 3 No. 1 - Public Participation Team

FieldDay

The PPT is researching the Forest Service public participation processes and working to increase stakeholder involvement in SNAMP through regular public meetings and reporting, public outreach, and an interactive website. The PPT coordinates and facilitates all SNAMP meetings, field trips, and events. In addition, the PPT seeks to facilitate an open dialogue amongst scientists and interested members of the public. Our goal is to maintain an open and transparent process throughout the research and implementation stages of SNAMP. To learn more about the public participation team please check out the Spring '09 PPT newsletter!

Newsletters | 20 October 2008

Fall 2008 SNAMP Newsletter: Vol 2. No 3 - Spatial Team


Lidar Geospatial data, or data linked to a place on the surface of the earth, is increasingly a part of our everyday lives and an important resource for environmental research. Geospatial data play a large role in the SNAMP project. We are mapping the forest before and after SPLAT treatments, and measuring forest habitat characteristics across our treatment and control sites. This newsletter discusses one of our datasets, called LIDAR, a new tool that shows great promise for mapping forests. To learn more about LIDAR please check out the Fall '08 Spatial newsletter!

Newsletters | 9 October 2008

Fall 2008 SNAMP Newsletter: Vol 2. No 2 - Spotted Owl Team Research

Owl Picture

The California Spotted Owl is an uncommon resident in the Mixed Conifer belt of the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, and a State and Federal Species of Special Concern. California spotted owls nest in mature trees and hunt from the vantage point of large trees. High intensity fire that leaves few trees alive has a negative impact on owl habitat, but forest fuel reduction treatments remove canopy cover and vertical structure of the trees. This research will assess the impacts of forest fuel treatments on owl territory, occupancy rates and reproductive output. To learn more about this project, please check out the Fall '08 Owl newsletter!

Newsletters | 7 October 2008

Fall 2008 SNAMP Newsletter: Vol 2. No 1 - Fisher Team Research

fisher
The Pacific Fisher is a State and Federal Species of Special Concern. The SNAMP fisher study is designed to determine whether the fisher population in the southern study area is stable or decreasing, which vital rate is most important in population change, and which environmental factors are correlated with these changes. Since Dec '07 we have captured and fitted over 20 different fisher with radio-collars. By the end of the study we anticipate having information on the age, home range and habitat use of around 40 individual fisher. To learn more about this project, please check out the Fall '08 Fisher newsletter!

Newsletters | 11 July 2008

Summer 2008 Newsletter: Vol 1. No. 3 - Water Team

Water This issue focuses on the Water Team. The Water Team members will be monitoring water quality and quantity across SNAMP treatment and control catchments prior to and after treatments. They are investigating impacts of strategic fuel treatments in SNAMP study areas on water quantity and quality, treatment and control catchments prior to, and after, treatments. For more information on this project, and the Water Team research methods and outreach effort, please check out the Summer '08 newsletter!

Newsletters | 21 February 2008

Spring 2008 SNAMP Newsletter: Vol. 1 No. 2 - Forest & Fire Team Research

Field Crew Picture

This issue focuses on the Fire and Forest Ecosystem Health Team. The Fire and Forest Health Team will investigate effects of strategic fuel treatments on fire behavior, tree morbidity and mortality, and forest health. Crews are collecting information on forest structure and composition, shrubs and fuels. The first two years of the project (2007 and 2008) are focused on collecting pre-treatment data. For more information on this project, and on the common tree species from our sites, please check out the Spring '08 newsletter!

Newsletters | 4 December 2007

Fall 2007 SNAMP Newsletter: Vol. 1 No. 1 - Welcome to SNAMP

Northern Site
This is the first SNAMP newsletter! The SNAMP project involves resource agencies, the public, and University Scientists to assess how vegetation treatments to prevent wildfire will affect fire risk, wildlife, forest health, and water quantity and quality. The Forest Service will be planning and implementing the treatments, while the University Science team will be independently monitoring and studying the effects of the projects. The public will be invited to provide feedback on the entire process. To learn more about the SNAMP project, please check out the Fall '07 newsletter!