Welcome to SNAMP! The Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project is a joint effort by the University of California, state and federal agencies, and the public to study management of forest lands in the Sierra Nevada.

Read More...
15 November 2014

Green Blog on The effects of density and high severity fire on tree and forest health

The article from the UC Cooperative Extension Green Blog describes the effects of density and high severity fire on tree ...

Read More »

Teams

Teams of university scientists study the predicted and actual effects of management practices. Learn about who they are, how they conduct their research, and what's new.

News

15 November 2014

Green Blog on The effects of density and high severity fire on tree and forest health

The article from the UC Cooperative Extension Green Blog describes the effects of density and high severity fire on tree and forest health. For more details of the article, please follow the link here:

Newsletters | 6 November 2014

SNAMP Newsletter Vol. 7 No. 2 - IT Meeting Wrap up

We are in the midst of a very busy final year as each team continues to work on data analysis, integration and final report writing. Part of our SNAMP commitment is to provide opportunities for all stakeholders to participate in meetings where information is shared and ideas exchanged. In this vein, each Science Team participated in either an in-person meeting or webinar to inform SNAMP participants of their current research results and integration metrics. This newsletter is intended to provide one more link to the study and results, as well as to help better prepare participants for the Annual Meeting webinar on November 6, 2014. Please check out the Fall 2014 Integration Newsletter

5 November 2014

Group works to reduce man made threat to Pacific fisher in the southern Sierra

Cleanup of the mess left behind by illegal marijuana grow sites in national forests around Bass Lake, California is about to begin. On November 5th, 6th and 7th , volunteers are invited to join the High Sierra Volunteer Trail Crew to clean up the trash, irrigation piping, growing chemicals and poisons left behind when grow sites are abandoned or raided by law enforcement. Excessive fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides used in large quantities to grow these crops are often left behind to leak into forested watersheds. Poisons include anti rodent pesticides that have silently killed a wide variety of animals in the forest during their use and can continue to over the months that follow. The work will involve a full day of effort and some hiking. If interested, contact Anne Lombardo at amlombardo@ucanr.edu and bring a lunch as well as items for personal comfort: warmth, dry, water, sunscreen. The HSVTC will be providing safety equipment. This cleanup effort is made possible by a grant received by the Yosemite/Sequoia Resource Conservation District from the Chukchansi tribe as previously reported: http://snamp.cnr.berkeley.edu/news/2013/nov/26/25000-awarded-chukchansi-tribe-help-clean-marijuan/